Seminars and Colloquia

  1. The Nuclear Lattice Model,
    Hahn-Meitner-Institut, Berlin, Germany, October 1984.
  2. New Insights into Multifragmentation,
    Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA, November 1985.
  3. Percolation Description of Nuclear Fragmentation,
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA, April 1986.
  4. High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission in Heavy Ion Reactions,
    State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York, USA, October 1986.
  5. Do we Observe a Phase Transition of Nuclear Matter in Fragmentation Experiments?,
    California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, USA, October 1987.
  6. Nuclear Fragmentation - Phase Transition in Finite Systems,
    Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA, April 1988.
  7. Nuclear Fragmentation - Phase Transition in Finite Systems,
    University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, USA, April 1988.
  8. Nuclear Fragmentation - Phase Transition in Finite Systems,
    Justus Liebig Universität, Giessen, West Germany, June 1988.
  9. Some remarks on the kinetic energy distribution of intermediate mass fragments,
    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California, USA, August 1988.
  10. A model for high Tc superconductivity,
    Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA, November 1988.
  11. Production of high energy photons and pions in heavy ion collisions,
    Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, USA, February 1989.
  12. Monte Carlo simulation of Ising antiferromagnets with vacancies and High-Tc superconductivity,
    Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA, February 1989.
  13. Pion and photon production - new results,
    Kernforschungsanlage, Jülich, Germany, March 1989.
  14. Pion and photon production - new results,
    Justus Liebig Universität, Giessen, Germany, March 1989.
  15. New adventures with the nuclear equation of state,
    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California, USA, April 1989.
  16. Was können uns Schwerionenkollisionen über die Zustandsgleichung von Kernmaterie erzählen?,
    Universität Münster, Münster, Germany, June 1989.
  17. Role of the Delta in Pion and Photon Spectra,
    Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany, June 1989.
  18. Production of High Energy Photons and Pions in Heavy Ion Collisions,
    Universität München, Garching, West Germany, June 1989.
  19. Particle Production in Heavy Ion Collisions,
    University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, USA, December 1989.
  20. Signals of Phase Transitions in Hadronic Matter,
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA, January 1990.
  21. Particle Production in Heavy Ion Collisions and the Implications for the Nuclear Equation of State,
    Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA, January 1990.
  22. Percolation,
    University of Indiana, Bloomington, Indiana, USA, February 1990.
  23. Particle Production in Heavy Ion Collisions,
    University of Indiana, Bloomington, Indiana, USA, February 1990.
  24. Particle Production in Heavy Ion Collisions,
    Grand Accélérateur National d'Ions Lourds, Caen, France, March 1990.
  25. Decay of Ordered and Chaotic Systems,
    Justus Liebig Universität, Giessen, West Germany, June 1990.
  26. Decay of Ordered and Chaotic Systems,
    Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany, June 1990.
  27. Nuclear Percolation: How to Study Phase Transitions in Nuclei with Methods from Solid State Physics,
    University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA, October 1990.
  28. New Results from 2-Proton Interferometry,
    California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, USA, October 1990.
  29. Decay of Ordered and Chaotic Systems,
    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California, USA, October 1990.
  30. New Results from 2-Proton Interferometry,
    Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon, USA, October 1990.
  31. Decay of Ordered and Chaotic Systems,
    Campus Theory Seminar, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA, November 1990.
  32. Computers in Physics,
    Colloquium, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, Michigan, USA, November 1990.
  33. Protonen-Bilder heisser Kernmaterie,
    Justus Liebig Universität, Giessen, Germany, November 1990.
  34. Protonen-Bilder heisser Kernmaterie,
    Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany, November 1990.
  35. Decay of Regular and Chaotic Systems,
    Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada, December 1990.
  36. Two-Proton Intensity Interferometry for Heavy Ion Collisions,
    Instituto de Estudos Avançados, Centro Técnico Aerospacial, São José dos Campos, São Paulo, Brazil, September 1991.
  37. Two-Proton Intensity Interferometry for Heavy Ion Collisions,
    Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil, September 1991.
  38. Chaos and Intermittency,
    Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil, September 1991.
  39. Decay of Chaotic and Non-Chaotic Sytems,
    Colloquium, Department of Statistics and Probability, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA, October 1991.
  40. Hadronische Transporttheorie für SIS-Energien,
    Graduiertenkolleg, Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany, December 1991.
  41. Heavy Ion Transport Theory,
    Hahn-Meitner-Institut, Berlin, Germany, March 1992.
  42. Nuclear Fragmentation,
    Niels-Bohr-Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark, October 1992.
  43. Lernen und Lehren im kulturellen Vergleich Deutschland-USA,
    Xerox International Training Center, Leesburg, Virginia, USA, November 1992.
  44. Two Particle Interferometry with Pions and Protons,
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, November 1992.
  45. Multifragmentation,
    Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, USA, November 1992.
  46. Nuclear Fragmentation,
    McGill University, Montreal, Canada, December 1992.
  47. Theory Overview,
    National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, Michigan, USA, December 1992.
  48. What is so interesting about heavy ion collisions?,
    Departmental Colloquium, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA, December 1992.
  49. What is so interesting about heavy ion collisions?,
    University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, USA, April 1993.
  50. Nuclear Deformation and Chaotic Motion,
    Lawrence Berekeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California, USA, August 1993.
  51. Nuclear Deformation and Chaotic Motion,
    Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil, August 1993.
  52. Chaotic Scattering,
    Departmental Colloquium, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, USA, September 1993.
  53. Chaotic Scattering,
    Departmental Colloquium, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, USA, October 1993.
  54. Chaos and Predictability,
    Departmental Colloquium, State University of New York at Stony Brook, New York, USA, November 1993.
  55. Chaos and Predictability,
    Departmental Colloquium, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio, USA, March 1994.
  56. Fractals and Cancer Recognition,
    Departmental Colloquium, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA, April 1994.
  57. Interferometrie für Schwerionenkollisionen,
    Universität Rostock, Germany, June 1994.
  58. Nuclear Fragmentation: Phase Transitions in Finite Systems,
    Cyclotron Colloquium, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, USA, July 1994.
  59. Fractals and Cancer Recognition,
    University of Giessen, Germany, September 1994.
  60. Cancer Detection and Fractal Dimension Analysis,
    California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, USA, October 1994.
  61. The Physics of Sports and Toys,
    Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington, USA, November 1994.
  62. Nuclear Fragmentation,
    National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA, February 1995.
  63. Nuclear Fragmentation - Critical Behavior in Very Small Systems,
    Departmental Colloquium, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, USA, March 1995.
  64. Theory Overview - Part II, Nuclear Reactions,
    National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA, August 1995.
  65. Computer Aided Instruction: Some Successes and Plans in MSU Physics,
    Departmental Colloquium (1 of 5 speakers), Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA, September 1995.
  66. Nuclear Microscopy,
    Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, November 1995.
  67. Use of Fractals in Cancer Detection,
    Colloquium, Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware, USA, November 1995.
  68. Self-Organized Criticality, Random Walks, Diffusion, Predictability,
    Columbia University, New York, New York, USA, November 1995.
  69. Nuclear Microscopy via Two-Particle Correlations,
    Joint nuclear seminar, University of Pennsylvania and Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, December 1995.
  70. Self-Organized Criticality,
    Departmental Colloquium, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA, December 1995.
  71. Self-Organization in your Favorite Word Processor,
    Departmental Colloquium, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, Michigan, USA, February 1996.
  72. The Principle of Self-Organization in Sand Piles, Earthquakes, Stock Markets, Biological Evolution, and Computer Word Processors,
    Campus Theory Seminar, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA, February 1996.
  73. Self-Organization,
    Technische Hochschule, Darmstadt, Germany, June 1996.
  74. New Developments in Nuclear Fragmentation,
    DAPNIA/SPHN, Orme des Merisiers, Gif-sur-Yvette, France, June 1996.
  75. MultiMedia Physics,
    Verlag Harry Deutsch, Frankfurt, Germany, June 1996.
  76. New Developments in Nuclear Fragmentation,
    Graduiertenkolleg Schwerionenphysik, Giessen, Germany, June 1996.
  77. MultiMedia Physics,
    College of Natual Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA, August 1996.
  78. Chaos and Predictability,
    Departmental Colloquium, Michigan Technelogical University, Houghton, Michigan, USA, September 1996.
  79. Self-Organization,
    Departmental Colloquium, Hope College, Holland, Michigan, USA, October 1996.
  80. MultiMedia Physics,
    MULTI Program, Leadership Workshop for Chairs and Directors, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA, November 1996.
  81. Self-Organized Criticality,
    SLAC Departmental Colloquium, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, USA, January 1997.
  82. Interferometry,
    Heavy-Ion-Tea, Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California, USA, January 1997.
  83. Self-Organization, Chaos & Predictability,
    California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, USA, January 1997.
  84. MultiMedia Physics,
    Instructional Technology Brown Bag Series, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA, January 1997.
  85. The origin of power-laws in nuclear fragmentation,
    Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, USA, January 1997.
  86. Nuclear Fragmentation,
    Nuclear seminar, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA, April 1997.
  87. Using Multimedia and the Internet for Teaching,
    Departmental colloquium, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA, April 1997.
  88. Multimedia and the Internet for Distance Learning,
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA, May 1997.
  89. Detecting Cancer via Fractal Dimension Analysis,
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA, May 1997.
  90. The Fragmentation Phase Transition,
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA, May 1997.
  91. Fragmentation,
    Universität Rostock, Rostock, Germany, July 1997.
  92. Two-Particle Correlations,
    Kernforschungszentrum Rossendorf, Germany, July 1997.
  93. Teaching in the Virtual University,
    West Shore Community College, Scottville, Michigan, USA, September 1997.
  94. Di-leptons from Final State Interactions - Solution to the CERES Puzzle?
    Kern-Kolloquium, Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt, Germany, October 1997.
  95. Nuclear Fragmentation,
    INF, Catania, Italy, October 1997.
  96. Two-Particle Correlations,
    INF, Catania, Italy, October 1997.
  97. Self-Organization,
    Universität Giessen, Germany, March 1998.
  98. "Multi Media Physics" - An Experiment on Web-based Teaching at Michigan State University,
    Ohlinger Publishers/Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA, April 1998.
  99. Nuclear Fragmentation - Phase Transition in a Mesoscopic System,
    Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, USA, April 1998.
  100. Teaching Physics with the Internet,
    Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, USA, April 1998.
  101. Self-Organized Criticality,
    Nuclear Science Division colloquium, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California, USA, June 1998.
  102. Teaching and Training via the Internet,
    Apple Computers, Cupertino, California, USA, June 1998.
  103. Teaching and Training via the Internet,
    The Pentagon, Washington, D.C., USA, July 1998.
  104. LectureOnline: Teaching Multimedia Science Courses via the Internet,
    University of Michigan, Michigan, USA, July 1998.
  105. Teaching Multimedia Science Courses via the Internet,
    Colloquium, Department of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, Brazil, September 1998.
  106. Are the Days of Classroom Lectures Numbered? (Teaching via the Internet),
    Colloquium, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA, October 1998.
  107. Are the Days of Classroom Lectures Numbered? (Teaching via the Internet),
    Colloquium, Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana, USA, February 1999.
  108. Are the Days of Classroom Lectures Numbered? (Teaching via the Internet),
    University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, April 1999.
  109. Selforganization and Emergence of Fractal Structure,
    Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, April 1999.
  110. Selforganization and Emergence of Fractal Structure,
    Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt, Germany, July 1999.
  111. MSU's lectureOnline system and Virtual Advanced Placement Physics Courses,
    APEX, Bellevue, Washington, USA, November 1999.
  112. Teaching/Learning and the World Wide Web,
    Ecole des Mines, Nantes, France, December 1999.
  113. The MSU-NSCL Nuclear Theory Program and RIA,
    University of Paris, Orsay, France, April 2000.
  114. Physikvorlesung per Internet,
    University of Kaiserslautern, Germany, April 2000.
  115. The role of the Internet in teaching - present and future,
    Seminar for Faculty on Instructional Technology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA, May 2000.
  116. The role of the Internet in teaching - present and future,
    Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, USA, May 2000.
  117. Phase transitions in finite systems: fragmentation of nuclei and molecules,
    Technical University of Warsaw, Poland, October 2000.
  118. Teaching in the 21st Century - What Role will the Internet Play?,
    Colloquium, Technical University of Warsaw, Poland, October 2000.
  119. Selforganization and the Emergence of Fractal Structure,
    Colloquium, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA, January 2001.
  120. What we have learned from teaching over 1000 students without classroom lectures,
    Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA, March 2001.
  121. Fragmentation Phase Transition: Universality Class, Extreme Finite Size Effects,
    Nuclear Colloquium, University of Frankfurt, Germany, July 2001.
  122. Fragmentation Phase Transition: Universality Class, Extreme Finite Size Effects,
    European Nuclear Physics Graduate School, University of Giessen, Germany, July 2001.
  123. Fragmentation Phase Transition: Universality Class, Extreme Finite Size Effects,
    Nuclear Colloquium, University of Munich, Germany, July 2001.
  124. The end of the long search for the critical point in nuclear fragmentation,
    Current research discussion, NSCL-MSU, East Lansing, Michigan, USA, March 2002.
  125. Phase Transitions in Atomic Nuclei,
    Colloquium, Arkansas State University, Jonesboro, Arkansas, USA, March 2002.
  126. Thermodynamic Phase Transitions in Nuclei and Molecules - Problem and Opportunities,
    Nuclear Physics Seminar, Yale University, February 2003.
  127. Phase Transitions in the Smallest and Largest Systems in Nature,
    Colloquium, University of Toledo, April 2003.
  128. Supernova-Physics,
    Sonderkolloquium, University of Frankfurt, Germany, August 2003.
  129. Common physics problems in heavy ion collisions and supernova explosions,
    IUCF Colloquium, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, USA, August 2003.
  130. Physikvorlesung auf dem Computer,
    European Nuclear Physics Graduate School, University of Giessen, Germany, October 2003.
  131. Managing Complexity,
    Investor Analytics Institute, New York City, New York, USA, November 2003.
  132. New Approach to Supernova Simulations,
    Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA, February 2004.
  133. Kinetic Theory for Supernova Explosions,
    Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Fisica, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, October 2005.
  134. The SOAR Telescope, Nuclear Astrophysics, and the Origin of the Elements,
    Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, October 2005.
  135. Explain it to me!,
    Instructional Technology Brown Bag Series, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA, January 2006.
  136. The Origin of the Elements,
    Science Colloquium, Aquinas College, Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA, March 2006.
  137. Teaching and Learning in the 21st Century,
    Departmental Colloquium, University of California at Berkeley, USA, October 2006.
  138. Supernova Explosions Modeling by Using Kinetic Theory,
    Research seminar, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California, USA, October 2006.
  139. The Origin of the Elements,
    Cyclotron Colloquium,Texas A&M University - College Station, Texas, USA, October 2006.
  140. Why you should major in physics,
    Student seminar, Texas A&M University - Commerce, Texas, USA, October 2006.
  141. Modeling Supernova Explosions,
    Departmental Colloquium, Texas A&M University - Commerce, Texas, USA, October 2006.
  142. Smashing Nuclei in Search of Phase Transitions,
    Physics Division Colloquium, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA, December 2006.
  143. Is bio-gas generation a cost-effective option for the Michigan energy economy?,
    Complex materials and their energy applications seminar, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA, February 2008.
  144. Neutrinos, Double-Beta Decays, and Supernova Dynamics,
    Nuclear physics colloquium, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, November 2008.
  145. Non-equilibrium phase transitions of non-trivial universality classes in nuclear physics,
    Condensed matter seminar, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA, January 2009.
  146. What can Michigan do about the energy crisis?,
    Colloquium, Andrews University, Berrien Springs, Michigan, USA, January 2009.
  147. The global energy problem: how big is it, and what can we do about it?,
    University of Giessen, Germany, June 2009.
  148. Increasing the Number of Physics Majors - How Do We Do It?,
    Colloquium, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, October 2009.
  149. The Physics of Quantum Computing - A New Paradigm in HIgh-Performance Computing?,
    Colloquium, Tsing Hua University, Taiwan, May 2010.
  150. The Physics of Quantum Computing - A New Paradigm in HIgh-Performance Computing?,
    Colloquium, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, May 2010.
  151. Is Quantum Computing the Next Big Thing?,
    Computer Science and Engineering Lecture Series, Michigan State University, September 2010.
  152. Global Warming - How bad is it? What can we do?,
    University of Frankfurt, Germany, October 2010.
  153. Turning a Farm into a Power Plant,
    Notre Dame University, South Bend , Indiana, November 2010.
  154. Vision for MSU's Department of Physics and Astronomy,
    Notre Dame University, South Bend , Indiana, November 2010.
  155. High Performance Computing,
    Faculty Seminars on Computing, Lunch Talk, Michigan State University, January 2011.
  156. Physics Education Research: What is known, what is unknown, and what are the known unknowns?,
    Colloquium, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, January 2011.
  157. Adventures in Physics Education Research and e-Learning,
    Sao Paulo Science Museum, Sao Paulo, Brazil, February 2011.
  158. Solutions for the Biggest Problem in the World: Energy, Global Warming, and Advanced Biofuel Reactors,
    Colloquium, Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, September 2011.
  159. Energy: solutions for the biggest problem of our time,
    Colloquium, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, September 2011.
  160. Energy: Some Solutions for the Biggest Problem of our Century,
    Colloquium, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, November 2011.
  161. Energy: Partial Solutions for the Biggest Problem of our Century,
    Colloquium, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, February 2012.
  162. Energy: Partial Solutions for the Biggest Problem of our Century,
    Colloquium, Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Frankfurt, Germany, March 2012.
  163. Energy for the 21st Century World Economy: Problems and Opportunities,
    Colloquium, McGill University, Montreal, Canada, September 2012.
  164. Energy: Some solutions for the biggest problem of our time,
    College colloquium, Hiram College, Hiram, Ohio, November 2012.
  165. Neue Wege in der Bioenergie - Lösungsansätze zur Energiewende,
    FIAS Forum, Frankfurt, Germany, January 2013.
  166. Energy,
    Michigan State University Board of Trustees meeting, January 2013.
  167. Building a Better Hydro,
    Colloquium, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, February 2013.
  168. Vision for the College of Sciences,
    Seminar, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia, February 2013.
  169. Teaching in the era of MOOCs,,
    Seminar, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia, April 2013.
  170. Teaching Physics for the 21st Century,
    Seminar, Instituto Politécnico Nacional Zacatenco, Mexico City, Mexico, June 2013.
  171. Teaching Physics for the 21st Century,
    Seminar, Tecnológico de Monterrey Campus Ciudad de México, Mexico City, Mexico, June 2013.
  172. Teaching Physics for the 21st Century,
    Seminar, Universidad de Guadalajara, Guadalajara, Mexico, June 2013.
  173. Teaching Physics for the 21st Century,
    Seminar, Universidad Jesuita de Guadalajara, Guadalajara, Mexico, June 2013.
  174. Teaching Physics for the 21st Century,
    Seminar, Tecnológico de Monterrey Campus Guadalajara, Guadalajara, Mexico, June 2013.
  175. Teaching Physics for the 21st Century,
    Seminar, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Monterrey, Mexico, June 2013.
  176. Using Kinetic Theory to Perform Hydrodynamics Calculations for Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions and Supernova Studies,
    Nuclear theory seminar, Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York, October 2013.
  177. The Global Energy Problem,
    Physics Colloquium, Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York, October 2013.
  178. Biogas Power Plant,
    TED-style talk, Energy Research Interdisciplinary Research Forum, MSU, East Lansing, Michigan, December 2013.
  179. A Better Hydrodynamics From Kinetic Theory,
    Nuclear Colloquium, University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany, January 2014.
  180. Genesis - der Ursprung der Elemente,
    Deutsche Bank-Stiftungsprofessur-Vorlesungsreihe, Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Frankfurt, Germany, January 2014.
  181. Using Kinetic Theory to Perform Hydrodynamics Calculations for Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions and Supernova Studies,
    Nuclear theory seminar, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, January 2014.
  182. The Physics of the Global Energy Problem and Possible Solutions,
    Colloquium, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, January 2014.
  183. Biogas Power Plant,
    Seminar, Energy Biosciences Institute, University of California, Berkeley, California, March 2014.
  184. Integrating Core Competencies in Engineering Education,
    Seminar, Escola de Engenharia de Lorena-USP, Lorena, Brazil, May 2014.
  185. The Physics of the Global Energy Problem,
    Physics Division Seminar, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, July 2014.
  186. Teaching Physics for the 21st Century,
    Seminar, Tecnológico de Monterrey Campus Monterey, Monterrey, Mexico, August 2014.
  187. Riding the MOOC Tsunami,
    Seminar, McGraw-Hill Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico, August 2014.
  188. Riding the MOOC Tsunami,
    Seminar, Universidad Tecnológica del Valle de Toluca, Mexico, August 2014.
  189. Teaching and Learning Physics in the 21st Century,
    Seminar, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Escuela Superior de Ingeniería Química, Mexico City, Mexico, August 2014.
  190. Teaching and Learning Physics in the 21st Century,
    Seminar, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Escuela Superior de Ingeniería Mecánica Y Eléctrica, Mexico City, Mexico, August 2014.
  191. Renewable Energy - A Physics Perspective,
    Physics colloquium, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, October 2014.
  192. Predicting the Future,
    Consumers Energy Leadership Academy, East Lansing, Michigan, December 2014.
  193. Can Thorium Fission Solve the World's Energy Problems?,
    Physics colloquium, Notre Dame University, South Bend, Indiana, February 2015.
  194. Global Warming and Renewable Energy Solutions,
    Physics colloquium, University of Texas, Austin, Texas, March 2015.
  195. Earth Day: Renewable Energy Solutions,
    Augustana College, Rock Island, Illinois, April 2015.
  196. Teaching and Learning Physics in the 21st Century,
    Augustana College, Rock Island, Illinois, April 2015.
  197. The Physics of the Global Energy Problem and Possible Solutions,
    Physics colloquium, University of Houston, Texas, May 2015.
  198. Fighting Global Warming with Renewable Power Sources,
    Seminar, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, China, September 2015.
  199. Global Warming and What We Can Do About It,
    Colloquium, George Washington University, Washington DC, March 2016.
  200. Improving Learning Outcomes in Large Introductory Lectures,
    Johannes Gutenberg Universität, Mainz, Germany, May 2016.
  201. The Physics of Global Warming and Renewable Energies,
    Goethe Universität, Frankfurt am Main, Germany, June 2016.
  202. Improving Learning Outcomes in Large Introductory Lectures,
    Justus-Liebig-Universität, Giessen, Germany, June 2016.
  203. MSU's FRIB Project,
    Justus-Liebig-Universität, Giessen, Germany, June 2016.
  204. Slowing Down Global Warming with Renewable Power Sources - What Physicists Can Do,
    Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan, October 2016.
  205. Die Zukunft der Subatomaren Physik,
    Festrede, Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Frankfurt, Germany, October 2016.
  206. Kann die Energiewende das Überhitzen der Erdatmosphere verhindern?,
    Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Frankfurt, Germany, November 2016.